IPPT Charts

Requirements


The Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT) is a mandatory fitness test for all male Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) personnel. It measures an individual's physical fitness level in five categories: sit-ups, push-ups, standing broad jump, 2.4km run, and chin-ups. The results are used to assess an individual's fitness level and determine their eligibility for certain promotions and career advancements. In this article, we will explore the IPPT charts and how they are used to assess a person's fitness level.

Singapore's Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT) is an annual fitness evaluation that all Demystifying Singapore's IPPT Chart: A Guide to the Annual Physical Fitness Test for NSmen


Singapore's Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT) is an annual fitness evaluation that all medically fit Operationally-Ready National Servicemen (NSmen) must take. It assesses an NSman’s physical fitness across three components - cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, and body composition.


The format has evolved over the decades but remains a key National Service (NS) institution. This article provides a comprehensive guide to understanding and excelling in your IPPT.


It is a mandatory annual fitness test that all NSmen from Basic Military Training onwards must take to determine their physical fitness. The key details are:


- Annual test for all medically fit NSmen


- Assesses Cardiovascular, Muscular Strength and Body Composition


- Conducted by certified SAF Fitness & Sports instructors


- Scored based on performance in stations and age group band


- Minimum passing marks required depending on NS liability


The IPPT results determine whether an NSman meets the annual fitness requirements of their NS duties. Fitness is an operational readiness requirement as soldiers must respond swiftly and vigorously during threats. Hence it instills fitness discipline and encourages healthy lifestyles amongst NSmen.


IPPT Score - Table

The charts are a set of tables that are used to convert an individual's performance in the five categories of the test into a score. The score is then used to assess the individual's fitness level and determine their eligibility for certain promotions and career advancements. They are divided into age groups, with different score requirements for each age group.


The score requirements for each age group are based on the average fitness level of individuals in that age group. The scores are divided into three categories: pass, silver, and gold. To pass the IPPT, an individual must achieve a score of at least 51 points, which is the minimum score requirement for all age groups.


For the sit-up category, it lists the number of repetitions required for each age group. The chart also includes the number of points awarded for each repetition, with a maximum of 10 points per repetition. For the push-up category, the chart lists the number of repetitions required for each age group, as well as the number of points awarded for each repetition, with a maximum of five points per repetition.


For the standing broad jump category, it lists the distance required for each age group, with the number of points awarded based on the individual's performance. For the 2.4km run category, the chart lists the time required for each age group, with the number of points awarded based on the individual's performance. Finally, for the chin-up category, the chart lists the number of repetitions required for each age group, with the number of points awarded for each repetition, with a maximum of 10 points per repetition.

IPPT Score

To use it, an individual must first complete the IPPT test and record their performance in each of the five categories. Once the individual has recorded their performance, they can use it to calculate their score. The score is then used to determine the individual's fitness level and eligibility for certain promotions and career advancements.


If an individual achieves a score of 51 points or higher, they pass the IPPT and are considered fit for military service. If they achieve a score of 61 points or higher, they are awarded a silver award, and if they achieve a score of 75 points or higher, they are awarded a gold award. The award is based on the individual's overall performance in all five categories of the test.


They are an important tool for assessing an individual's fitness level and determining their eligibility for certain promotions and career advancements. The charts provide a clear and objective way to assess an individual's performance in the five categories of the test, and they help to ensure that all individuals in the SAF meet a minimum standard of physical fitness.

IPPT Score - IPPT Table

It provide a number of benefits for the SAF and its personnel. By providing a clear and objective way to assess an individual's fitness level, the charts help to ensure that all individuals in the SAF meet a minimum standard of physical fitness. This can help to ensure that the SAF is able to perform its duties effectively and efficiently.


In addition, it can provide motivation for individuals to maintain a high level of physical fitness.

IPPT
ippt
ippt
ippt
ippt
ippt

Source credit: www.ns.sg

The IPPT (Individual Physical Proficiency Test) score is a measure of an individual's physical fitness level in Singapore. It consists of three components: push-ups, sit-ups, and a 2.4-kilometer run. The test is designed to measure an individual's strength, endurance, and agility. In this article, we will discuss what the score is, how it is calculated, what the passing score is, and why it is important to maintain a good score.

IPPT Score - What is it?

It is a measure of an individual's physical fitness level in Singapore. It is based on the performance of the individual in three components of the IPPT test: push-ups, sit-ups, and a 2.4-kilometer run. The test is designed to measure an individual's strength, endurance, and agility. The test is conducted annually for Singaporeans who are serving national service and is mandatory for all male citizens and permanent residents. The test is also open to female citizens and permanent residents who wish to take it voluntarily.

IPPT Score - How is Calculated?

It is calculated based on the performance of the individual in each of the three components of the test. The maximum score for each component is as follows:

  • Push-ups: Maximum score of 50 points
  • Sit-ups: Maximum score of 50 points
  • 2.4-kilometer run: Maximum score of 50 points

The minimum passing score for each component is as follows:

  • Push-ups: 17 repetitions
  • Sit-ups: 21 repetitions
  • 2.4-kilometer run: 11 minutes and 30 seconds

The maximum score for the overall test is 100 points. To pass the test, an individual must score at least 61 points. The score is calculated using a formula that takes into account the performance of the individual in each of the three components of the test.

What is the Passing Score for the IPPT Test?

The minimum passing score for the IPPT test is 61 points. To achieve this score, an individual must perform at least 17 push-ups, 21 sit-ups, and complete the 2.4-kilometer run in 11 minutes and 30 seconds or less. If an individual fails to achieve the minimum passing score, he or she will have to undergo remedial training until the passing score is achieved. The individual will be given up to three attempts to pass the test.

Why is it Important to Maintain a Good IPPT Score?

Maintaining a good score is important for several reasons. Firstly, it is a requirement for all male citizens and permanent residents who are serving national service in Singapore. Failure to achieve the minimum passing score will result in the individual having to undergo remedial training until the passing score is achieved. This can be a time-consuming and costly process.

Secondly, maintaining a good score is important for overall health and fitness. Regular exercise has been shown to improve cardiovascular health, reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, and improve mental health. The test is a good indicator of an individual's overall fitness level and can serve as motivation to maintain a regular exercise routine.

Thirdly, a good score can also have career benefits. Many jobs in the public sector require individuals to maintain a good score as a condition of employment. In addition, a good IPPT score can also demonstrate discipline, determination, and commitment, which are desirable qualities in many workplaces.

Evolution of IPPT Format


The format has evolved considerably over the decades:


1960s-1970s: Basic fitness test

5 fitness components - Chin-ups, Sit-ups, 4km run, Shuttle run, Skipping


1982: Streamlined to 3 components

2.4km run, Sit-ups, Pull-ups


1990s: Push-ups replace Pull-ups

2 components: 2.4km run, Push-ups


2002: Current 3 component IPPT introduced

2.4 km run, Push-ups, Sit-ups


The streamlined test focuses on cardio and upper and lower body strength which are key fitness markers relevant to military tasks. The current 3-station IPPT provides an efficient yet comprehensive assessment.


Pre-IPPT Preparation


Proper preparation before it will help you perform at your best:


- Stay injury-free - Seek early treatment for injuries to be certified fit for IPPT


- Work on your weakness - Use pre-IPPT training to improve on areas you struggle with


- Train consistently - Exercise regularly; don't just cram before it


- Know the requirements - Understand the standard of each station and the pacing needed


- Hydrate and rest well - Drink enough water and have good sleep for energy


- Have light meal - Eat comfortably 2-3 hours pre-IPPT; avoid heavy meals


- Loosen up - Do light stretches; don't strain yourself before stations


- Dress comfortably - Wear suitable attire and running shoes; avoid restrictive outfits


With thorough preparation, you will step up confidently and perform your best for each station.

Administration of IPPT


On your test day, here's what you can expect:


1. Registration


Report punctually for attendance-taking and document verification. You may be ushered into platoons.


2. Warm Up


Do dynamic stretching as a group led by instructors to get muscles activated and blood pumping.


3. Briefing


Instructors will brief on test sequence, station requirements, and safety reminders. Clarify doubts.


4. 2.4km Run


This station starts first, usually conducted on a 400m track. Run at a steady comfortable pace.


5. Sit Ups


Performed after run while muscles are still warm. Do properly timed sit-ups based on your age group.


6. Push Ups

The final test station. Give your maximum given your remaining stamina. Observe form.


7. Cool Down


Gentle stretches to cool down muscles. Remember to hydrate well after the test.


8. Results


Your results for each station will be recorded and tabulated.


Pace strategically; don't over-exert. Follow instructions and safety measures. Make use of pre-IPPT training to prepare for the actual test.


2.4 km Run


This tests cardiovascular fitness - essential for all military duties. A fast run time indicates good endurance:


- Run 2.4km as quickly as possible


- 400m track; 6 rounds total


- Use proper running techniques to optimize pace and stamina


- Hydrate at water points; don't stop


- Your result is your run timing


Adopting an even, steady pace is key. Don't bolt and tire quickly. Hydrate and sustain your speed for the full distance.


Sit Ups


This station tests abdominal and hip flexor muscular strength:


- Do as many proper sit-ups executed in a minute


- Bend your knees at 90 degrees, feet flat on the mat


- Place hands beside the head, fingers touching ears


- Partner anchors your feet firmly


- Raise torso to vertical position and return


- No jerking; keep elbows by sides and arms straight


Maintain good form. Move steadily without arching your back or pulling your neck. Maximise reps within 60 seconds.


Push Ups


This tests upper body and arm muscular strength:


- Do as many proper push-ups executed in a minute


- Assume a standard push-up position, hands shoulder-width apart


- Chest lowers to partner's fist on the mat


- Fully extend arms to return to the start position


- No sagging or arched back; the body should be straight


- Elbows kept close to the body; no flaring outward


Keep body rigid and straight. Descend and ascend smoothly. Maximise legal reps within 60 seconds.

IPPT Scoring System


Your performance is scored based on age and number of repetitions:


- Results for each station correspond to a points scale


- Age adjustments factor in reduced physical capabilities over time


- Points for all 3 stations are added to produce the total score


- Minimum points required depends on the NS training phase


Aim for the maximum points your fitness level will allow. However, don't risk injury by overexerting. Pace yourself strategically.


IPPT Requirements


Depending on your NS Training phase, the minimum points to pass are:


NS Training Phase Minimum Points to Pass


Full Time National Serviceman 61 Points


Operationally Ready National Serviceman

- < 30 years old 60 Points

- 30 - 39 years old 50 Points

- 40 - 49 years old 45 Points

- ≥ 50 years old 35 Points


Passing IPPT is necessary to maintain active NSman status. Strive to keep fit and not just scrape by with minimum points. Treat it seriously.


IPPT Performance Standards


The number of reps required for maximum points varies across age groups:


Age Excellent (Push Ups) Excellent (Sit Ups) Excellent (2.4km Run Timing)


18 - 19 > 85 > 60 < 8:30 mins


20 - 24 > 80 > 50 < 9 mins


25 - 29 > 75 > 45 < 9:30 mins


30 - 34 > 70 > 40 < 10 mins


35 - 39 > 65 > 35 < 10:30 mins


40 - 44 > 60 > 30 < 11 mins


45 - 49 > 50 > 25 < 11:30 mins


50 - 54 > 45 > 20 < 12 mins


55 - 59 > 40 > 15 < 12 mins


60 and above > 30 > 10 < 12 mins


Check your age group band and aim to train for excellent grading standards. But take note of your fitness level and don't overexert.

Appealing Your Results


If you underperform and fail IPPT, you can submit an appeal request:


- Appeal must be submitted within 2 weeks of IPPT


- Requires valid justification and supporting documents


- Common grounds are injury, illness, compassionate reasons etc


- Endorsed appeal may allow re-take or lead to its exemption


- Maximum 2 successive attempts allowed for re-take


Appeal only for valid reasons, not because you failed to train sufficiently. Provide documentation like medical certificates to support your appeal.

IPPT Training Support


Seeking early help will improve your performance:


- Approach commanders to schedule remedial training


- Attend IPPT preparatory programs like I-PREP


- Engage personal fitness trainers to improve physical fitness


- Download IPPT training guides and fitness apps


- For injury recovery, see MOs to plan appropriate exercises


- Adopt a balanced fitness regime integrating cardio, weights, and diet


IPPT should be a priority alongside work and family commitments. Make time to train progressively.

Beyond IPPT: Lifelong Fitness


More than just passing it, use NS as motivation to adopt lifelong fitness habits:


- Maintain a healthy diet: Cut down on junk food, have balanced nutrition


- Stay active daily: Exercise at least 30min even on non-training days


- Focus on holistic fitness: Train muscular strength, endurance and flexibility


- Prevent injury: Warm up properly; don't overstrain; use proper form


- Make exercise enjoyable: Take up sports, join fitness communities for camaraderie


- Set goals: Sign up for running or fitness events to stay motivated


Developing positive fitness habits during NS will keep you combat-ready while benefiting your long-term health.


Frequently Asked Questions


Here are some common questions on IPPT:


1. If I fail, how long do I have to pass my re-take?


You have 12 months. Upon failing IPPT, you will be assigned PES C Category 1 and have 12 months to pass a re-test.


2. What happens if I keep failing?


You may be charged and face penalties. You will also be assigned PES F and excused from further IPPT but are still liable for annual health checks.


3. Instead of IPPT, can I take the NAPFA test?


No, NAPFA is a separate civilian test. IPPT is mandated for NSmen. But both ultimately aim to improve overall population fitness.


4. I'm feeling unwell. Can I postpone my it?


You have to provide medical documentation like sick leave and request for exemption. This allows re-scheduling IPPT after you recover.


5. How soon can I take it after an injury?


You should only attempt IPPT after fully recovering from injury and getting medical clearance. Rushing may worsen the injury.


6. I failed IPPT. How can I appeal?


You have to submit a written appeal with supporting documents within 2 weeks to your Unit Head justifying valid reasons like injuries, bereavement etc.


Make an effort to stay fit. Seek help early if struggling. Understand the its requirements clearly. Maintain fitness diligently as an NSman.


Conclusion


It is an integral and longstanding institution that underlines the SAF’s emphasis on operational readiness. Maintaining physical fitness standards allows NSmen to effectively respond to protect Singapore.